Paciano

HISTORY 

Paciano, a small medieval centre in the province of Perugia, is situated on the slopes of Mount Petrarvella, 391 metres above sea level. The town, named among the most beautiful medieval centres in Italy, still preserves its traditions based on love respect and care for its olive grove landscape and also thanks to the active participation of its small local community, less than 1000 inhabitants, who are aware of the importance of land preservation and of pursuing all the projects of economic development in respect of   local traditions, the environment, and the town’s distinctive qualities. The natural and social landscape, still retaining its rural character, is a vivid expression of the relationship between the living present and the ways of life inherited from the past; Paciano is rich in memories, artworks and unique landscape features.

 

LUOGHI DI INTERESSE

Palazzo Baldeschi > The palace s situated in Paciano’s old town centre. As well as housing the TrasiMemo – Trasimeno Memory Bank museum exhibits, the Palazzo also houses the online Memory Bank’s consultation area, with access to all the content, allowing visitors to explore the themes in greater depth, as well as a free internet access point, workshops for educational activities, knowledge and experience exchange workshops, the municipal library, a conference hall, the Third Millennium Centre and a formal garden with beautiful views over the lake. The Tourist Information office on the ground flor keeps visitors upto-date regarding all the latest events and activities in the town.
The Palazzo as it stands today is the result of a long period of reflection and debate, lasting 30 years, on what role this essential part of the local cultural heritage should play in the community. The historical building belongs to the Region of Umbria. By agreement with Paciano’s municipal authorities the building is managed by the local community.

TrasiMemo > The museum is an innovative cultural project designed to promote sustainable rural living by giving prominence to “hidden” local skills, in collaboration with local people – the guardians of their own heritage – institutions, and cultural heritage professionals. The project promotes cultural production and craft activities that would otherwise risk becoming marginalised. Working in partnership with people skilled in a variety of very diffrent filds, with the direct participation of the craftsmen and women themselves, museum exhibits have been created (both virtual and physical) in order to communicate these realities via both traditional and multimedia means, with the aim of taking the visitor on an inclusive and poignant journey.
TrasiMemo presents the craftsmanship skills that have been passed down from generation to generation as solid resources for the future of Trasimeno, and as a constituent element of local community cohesion. Visitors are encouraged to explore this process of self-rediscovery and consider the dynamics of the local community’s relationship with the territory, through the tales and testimonies of the people themselves. These stories become a prism through which to consider the potential of the territory and its inhabitants, a way to talk about possible forms of future local development. The project analyses cross-sections of twentieth century culture through the use of an immersive space with an emphasis on manufacturing and craftsmanship that combines tradition and innovation. It identifis the common ground connecting the tangible objects and intangible knowledge of the past with contemporary practices: the artisan tools on display are often identical to the tools still used today, and the recorded voices of the protagonists (set down on paper or in audio fies) speak across the generations. TrasiMemo has no intention of simply preserving objects locked away in glass cabinets, collecting and storing items in order to contemplate an idealised past: it is, rather, an open, collaborative, interactive space, where the heritage on display, composed of memories, personal and family histories, spoken testimonies and so on, is revitalised to look towards the future. The exhibition anticipates a participatory relationship with visitors: a space of playful and lively interaction that stimulates the experience of discovery and facilitates learning. TrasiMemo is designed for and belongs to everybody: it belongs to the artisans, and to anyone with memories of local knowledge; it belongs to the people who live in the area, contributing to the creation of a living, dynamic territory; it belongs to the heritage professionals who, through their research, strive to safeguard memories in their various forms, organising them into narratives for the future; and it belongs to the visitors who decide to enrich their experience of Trasimeno by fiding out more about the intricate relationship between its inhabitants, its landscapes and its local resources.
The exhibition evokes the feeling of an archive. However, visitors don’t peruse documents or fies, but stories and practices divided into four broad filds: iron and metals, wood, cotto, and fabrics. Four display cabinets, one for each theme, face four large information panels, which function as guides to help visitors explore the archive. The visitor is invited to use the exhibition to discover the layers of memory hidden in the tablets, in the drawers of the display cabinets, in the archive chest of drawers, in the writing on the walls… Between the virtual content and the physical exhibits visitors can learn to recognise the signs of craftsmanship that characterise the surrounding landscape, and learn to appreciate its complexity and fragility.
The Museum Installation
The exhibition evokes the feeling of an archive. However, visitors don’t peruse documents or fies, but stories and practices divided into four broad filds: iron and metals, wood, cotto, and fabrics. Four display cabinets, one for each theme, face four large information panels, which function as guides to help visitors explore the archive. The visitor is invited to use the exhibition to discover the layers of memory hidden in the tablets, in the drawers of the display cabinets, in the archive chest of drawers, in the writing on the walls… Between the virtual content and the physical exhibits visitors can learn to recognise the signs of craftsmanship that characterise the surrounding landscape, and learn to appreciate its complexity and fragility.
There are large panels on the walls of the exhibition room that serve as a guide to the exhibits, to help visitors navigate the themes covered in both the multimedia content and the physical exhibits themselves.
The panels are divided into diffrent sections. There is an introductory section, followed by three sections covering diffrent concepts: working practices and craftsmanship; secrets and tricks of the trade; and the relationship between the work and the territory. Together, these concepts unite the life stories of the protagonists with how their interventions have moulded the local landscape, villages and towns.
Digital archive
In the Archives Room you can visit the Online Bank of Memories. Here you can explore all the virtual contents, which are constantly growing; whether in text, video, audio, or photographic format.
Trasimemo is constantly evolving, and visitors are invited, if they want, to expand its memory with their own contributions.
Workshop
Running workshops is an essential element of the concept of the Memory Bank as a place to meet up, share ideas, and launch, promote and support cultural initiatives.
TrasiMemo is a flxible space suited to a wide variety of activities, and organises educational, research and practical workshops, exhibitions, public meetings, and conferences, as well as seminars, games and recreational activities.

THE MEDIEVAL GATES OF PACIANO > The medieval centre of Paciano overlooks the surrounding area thanks to its three medieval gates of the historic centre. Still nowadays they are considered the town’s landmarks, in order to make appointments and to give directions to tourists.
“Porta Perugina” which is located north of the medieval walls, overlooks the panoramic road which led in ancient times to the capital city of Perugia. Today the road represents the best connection either for trekking tours through chestnut and holm oak forests or simply to sightsee and discover the Lands of Perugino. The road which starts from Porta Perugina leads in just about 3 Kilometres to Panicale, with an awesome view of the Lake Trasimeno and the surrounding hills, is worth to be seen.
The other road which goes down to the “Formone” reaches “le fonti” (the water springs?). From Porta Perugina it is also possible to drive on the road, leaving Paciano behind, with a breathtaking view of the lake. While enjoying this beautiful view, we reach the church of Santa Maria and the square on which overlooks Porta Fiorentina.
The gate is well preserved and provided a point of controlled access to town. It overlooks the public gardens and if you take a look beyond the holm oak trees, you will also be able to spot Tuscany in the distance (from Cortona to Cetona, passing by Montepulciano). Porta Rastrella is the last access to the medieval centre. It overlooks the old rural and farming lands, which we can still perceive. A walkway which connects Palazzo Cennini to the Rocca Buitoni, where the coat of arms of Carlo Primo d’Angiò (the symbol of a rake and a Lily of France or Florentine together with the date written in Gothic signs ) anno Domini MCCC, is still visible. From this point   it is easy to spot the rural traces of the landscape which lead us to the Shrine of the Madonna della Stella “Virgin of the Star”. Just outside the Gate Rastrella we find “Le Fonti”.

THE TOWN WELL > Every medieval centre used to have its well. A meeting and evocative place, which was essential for the water supply during the Middle Ages and the New age. Nowadays it has become a place of memories and where people try to make their wishes come true. Paciano, as well has its own well, which also gives its name to one of ist streets “via del pozzo”.